Posts Tagged ‘clogged’

Removing a clog from Septic tank inlet baffle

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

Below is a video of a clogged inlet baffle.  This homeowner called us out for a pumping and thought his septic tank needed cleaned.  It did need cleaned, but for other reasons.  The tank was backed up due to a clogged inlet baffle.  And this advice could save you money in a case of a backup.

Just a reminder, this video is not an inspection.  A true inspection will involve sludge and scum measurements, second compartment (if applicable) inspection, and outlet baffle inspection.

Once unclogged, contact your local approved septic inspection contractor for an inspection.

Thanks for reading,

 
Ronnie

 

Saturday, July 28th, 2012

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FrWuOTkEaus

Here is a video of a clogged inlet baffle.  There are two reasons why this house backed up into the house.  The inlet pipe, abs plastic, was installed too far into the tank, and too close the concrete baffle.  And the second is excessive toilet paper use.

Really exciting stuff.

 

Thanks for reading,

 

Ronnie

 

RV Dump on septic system incorrectly installed

Wednesday, May 9th, 2012

This homeowner decided that he wanted to install an RV dump.  Now you have to be careful with RV wastewater.  There are two things wrong with RV wastewater.

RV dump added to septic system

RV dump added to septic system

1. The septic system was designed to take wastewater at small doses.  Not 250 gallons at a time.  It really stirs up the tank and causes the sludge layer to become stirred up and carried out to the drainfield.

2. The little packets that you have to put in the toilet to control the odors are not septic approved.  Now they may say “all natural” and “biodegradable” and that usually gives one a warm squishy feeling that it must be septic safe.  But all of those packets are really low on the PH scale.  Meaning acidic.  You have to kill bacteria to control odor.  So in effect, you are dumping 250 gallons of sanitized wastewater into your septic tank, effectively killing the bacteria.  Let alone what’s happening in #1.

But in this case, the pictures show that the RV dump was placed incorrectly.  He completely plugged up his drainfield.   Drainfields can handle water only.  No solids at all.  So as it is set up at his house.  Household wastewater flows from the house, to the septic tank, and exits to the drainfield.  A correctly installed RV dump would be placed in-between the house and the septic tank.  That way the RV waste would have some septic tank treatment, and solids separation before heading out the drainfield.  You can see in the pictures attached that the RV Dump was placed between the septic tank and the drainfield.

Modifications to your septic system should be done by someone qualified.  Or at least call us for a consult over the phone before an expensive mistake happens.

RV Dump added to Septic System 2

RV Dump added to Septic System 2

Repair pictures to follow.

 

Thanks for reading,

 

Ronnie

Competitor wrote this system up as a septic system failure

Sunday, November 6th, 2011

We were called out for a second opinion on this property just last saturday.  You will never believe what had happened.  There was smelly water and soggy ground in the backyard.  Our competitor charges $85.00 for a service call.  We charge $125.00

Again, one would think that all septic companies are the same, and the only difference is the price.  Nothing is further from the truth.   Here is what these homeowners got for their $85.00.  I copied and pasted this from their report they submitted to the Health Department.

 

We were called because drains werent working properly. On arrival we walked around house and found sewage surfacing badly ( standing 2-3′ deep ) by a large tree. Probeing the area we determined this to be the drainfield area. We then called the owners son and informed him that we felt any work we would do would be a waste of their money and advised them to contact Ek or evergreen (These two referenced here are septic design engineers) to replace the system. We were assured that this would take place soon. We have found that no response was taken to replace the drainfield. This system originaly served a home that has been removed or fallen down and the transport pipe is now routed from a mobile home. Renters do have small children that could have access to surfacing. Due to the need to address the drainfield issues we did not do a tank inspection

Now the competitor even stated that they didn’t dig up the tank.  They assumed that the soggy spot was the drainfield.  They simply failed the septic system, and reported it to the health department.

Clogged drainfield competitor failed the system and called the local health department

Clogged drainfield competitor failed the system and called the local health department

This is where we came in.  We were called by the homeowner to give a second opinion.  I told them that the area that was soggy and wet, was not the drainfield, but in fact the septic tank.  I exposed the tank and found that it had not been pumped in over 20 years.  It was so full that “solids” went out to the drainfield, and plugged up the pipes.  It cost him $325.00 to jet out the drainfield, and problem was solved.  The tank did need pumped out too for about $440.00.  The  Septic system is working as designed.  Now this case is not too rare.  Our competitor has done this twice this week.  In another case it was roots had clogged the transport line between the septic tank and the drainfield.  Giving the illusion of the septic system was failed.  In both cases proper diagnotics were not completed.  The competitor’s technician simply showed up and without digging, told homeowner that the system will need replaced and they need to write a check for anywhere from $6,500.00 to $18,000.00.  In both cases First Call Septic Service was able to complete repairs.  And save the homeowner a lot of money, heartache, and grief.  Oh, and the cost of the roots in the transport line repair was under $600.00.

So be careful when hiring a contractor that’s the cheapest.  Their might be a reason for it.  For $85 dollars, this homeowner got no work performed by the contractor at all.  For $85 they got a letter of failure givin to the health department, trying to scare the homeowner into hiring them to install a new septic system for up to $18,000.00.

 

Thanks for reading,

 

Ronnie

 

 

 

 

Septics and Diaper Wipes

Monday, December 13th, 2010
Diaper Wipes in Septic Tank

Diaper Wipes in Septic Tank

I truly hope this message finds you all well.  I also hope you aren’t eating breakfast or enjoying a nice cup of coffee.  But here it goes.  This is what diaper wipes looks like in a septic tank.  This is about 2 years of build up and is causing a huge problem in our industry.  Companies are putting “septic safe” and “septic approved” on almost all wipes now.

Let me better explain wipes too.  Diaper wipes doesn’t mean someone has kids.  People are now using these more and more to toilet paper for their better “cleaning” abilities.  And let me say this.  It’s okay.  Just put them in the can.  They cannot go into the toilet and into the tank.

Packaging requirements.

I truly think these companies should be held liable for these.  They put terms on the package to make people think they are septic safe.  Like:

Flushable:  This is true.  They will clear all of your plumbing and make it to the tank just fine.

Biodegradable: This is also true.  They Will break down in 99 years or less.  But in this example we were only in year 2 of the 99 years.  So we had another 97 years to go, before the very first diaper wipes that were being added start breaking down.  You can see that this is entirely too long for a septic system.

Septic Approved:  This term should be illegal to use.  There are no people or organizations watching this one.  There is no person named Septic signing off on this stuff.  And it’s costing homeowners 10’s of thousands of dollars.

Final note.  Easy accessible wipes are becoming more and more accessible.  Windex cleaning wipes.  Bleach wipes for countertops and stoves.  And for some reason there is a movement to flush these in the toilet.  I just don’t understand that.  Put it in the garbage.

Also, if you are unfortunate to have fallen for packaging.  Get your tanks pumped out now, before it becomes prohibitively expensive to remove, or in worse case senario replace.  As long as your system is working by the time we pump these out.  You’ll be okay.  But if you wait for it to quit.  Because these wipes are coating your drainfield, then it’s a system replacement.

Thanks a million for reading.

Ronnie