Posts Tagged ‘filter’

how septic systems work

Tuesday, June 30th, 2015

Watch this video for a basic understanding how simple septic systems work.

This applies to all Gravity Septic systems.

The more you know

 

 

Thanks for watching,

 

Ronnie

Septic tank backed up due to a clogged filter

Sunday, December 14th, 2014

Here is a friendly tip if you’re backed up in an emergency.  This home has a 2 compartment septic tank and an outlet filter that screens the effluent going to the drainfield.  This filter should be cleaned annually.  There is diaper wipes in this tank, so we pumped it out the same day.

In the video I pulled the filter out and put it back in right away, didn’t want to send too much unscreened effluent to the drainfield.  I forgot to video the portion where we wash it off with a garden hose.  It’s simple, just hose it off and put it back.

Thanks for reading,

 

Ronnie

septic system homeowner inspection video

Tuesday, September 9th, 2014

This link is the best video, by far, I have seen for homeowner self inspection.  Just in case you are one of those that want to share in the joy in septic work.  If you have 25 minutes, please watch this video.  If you don’t wish to participate in your self inspection, at least you will see what we are looking at when inspecting your system.


Now this is filmed for those needing explanations at nearly every step.  But this includes Gravity, Pressure Distrubution, Sand Filters, and Sand Mounds.  This video does not include Aerobic units or Proprietary Septic devices.

One thing to note, it did miss a necessary and mandatory test which is called a “Draw Down” test of all pump chambers.   This tells us two things, 1. how the pump is performing, and 2. how the next component is accepting the effluent.

Slow draw downs are not good.  It can mean the pump is not performing at a rate good enough to scour the lines, and keep the pipes clean, and/or the next component could be plugged and need cleaned.

There is a lot of good stuff here.

Thanks for reading,

 

Ronnie

Neglected Septic Pump Screens

Monday, August 13th, 2012

Here is a video of what happens when these screens are not cleaned annually.  And there is no “septic technician” in a bottle.  There’s no magical chemical that you flush that can clean this screen.  It needs to be completely disassembled and cleaned.  There’s no other way around it.

The consequences of not performing this maintenance, will be a pump that is starved and eventually burns up.  And these are not cheap pumps at all.  They start out at about $400 to replace and on up.  And I really mean that.  On up.

Enjoy the video and thanks for reading,

 

Ronnie

httpv://youtu.be/LPdzpiIBMmQ

 

 

Kitchen Grease in Septic Tank

Wednesday, March 28th, 2012

Here’s what happens when grease is added to the septic tank.  The PH drops and all septic tank bacteria dies, and this happens.  Let me tell you that this is never ever supposed to look like this.  The damage done to this sytem is really expensive.

No grease down the septic tank ever.  Or this can happen

 

Ground Water Intrusion causes massive damage when septic alarm is ignored

Wednesday, March 21st, 2012

Here is a video of another, “less expensive” riser installation on a septic system.  This homeowner simply took the lowest bid without asking questions.  And honestly, thought, “We are putting a collar on a septic tank.”  How hard can it be.  So he took the lowest bidder not realizing we have to be concerned about high ground water tables.  Now this has created a lot of problems downstream in this septic system.

Now this started taking on ground water back in november of last year.  This is when the homeowner’s septic alarm started to sound off that it was getting too much water.  The homeowner simply “silenced” the alarm.  Thinking it does this whenever it rains.  Stupid septic system.

Now the damage has been done.  You see, he has a sand filter.  Below is a video of the sand filter.  He said it started smelling really bad, but never was out there when the pumps came on to see this happening.

So if you look closely, you can see the color black.  It is stinky and slimy.  This is a bacteria that moves in when septic is surfacing above the ground.  It will always be present in surfacing sewage.  It is one thing a septic inspector is looking for.

Now the bad news.  If he would have called us when the alarm first started to sound, he would have saved a lot of money.

So some sand filter education.  A sand filter is just a huge, in-ground, pool filled with different grades of sand down to the bottom.  At the bottom the water is collected and pumped out to the drainfield.  There is an alarm in this sand filter that warns of a high water even.  This was the alarm that was ignored.  Now the sand filter went completely under water.  Two things happened.  One the sand filter is an aerobic component.  It needs oxygen to breath.  Actually the bacteria in the sand filter need oxygen to breath.  Also remember from the “how it works” page, that the septic tanks are the anaerobic environments.  Now since the sand filter went under water for two long, it went septic, and the bacteria died.  Therefore the sand filter died.  Now we could pump it out and have it dry out, and the bacteria would come back.  But the next problem is impossible to fix.  When the water is pumped out, the sand that was floating in all the water, compacts down as the water recedes.  Making the sand filter surface it’s water, instead of the effluent going down, it goes up, and surfaces.

So please remember.  A Service call is about $125.00 plus whatever parts are broken.  And may some additional labor.

But now this homeowner needs a new sand filter.  Which can run $5,000 to $7,000.  I truly feel bad for my customer’s when this happens.  This is why I have spent so much time on this website trying to educate, and inform homeowners that the power to save money on their septic system, lies with them.  Don’t forget to have their systems inspected and repair/pump what needs done, before this happens.

Thanks for reading,

 

Ronnie